JOURNAL OF GENTRY GENEALOGY
Issue B
February 2011
Home Page and Index

SPECULATIONS ON THE FAMILY OF
NATHANIEL GENTRY
Of South Carolina and Kentucky

by
Willard Gentry
Revision of Issue C, 2006

Introduction
Only a handful of references exist concerning the Nathaniel Gentry who lived in Spartanburg District in South Carolina in the years before 1800 and who seems to be the same Nathaniel Gentry as appeared in the 1810 census in Pulaski County, Kentucky. Yet enough information can be inferred from the record that we can surmise that he was one of the patriarchs of the third generation of Gentrys. The purpose of this article to present a series of speculations, that taken together, will present a cohesive and logical picture of Nathaniel and his family. We can liken this to a long-neglected tapestry hanging on the wall, speckled throughout with moth holes. At close range, if one were to try to make out the details of the pattern, there are far too many holes to perceive them. At a distance, looking at a much broader view of the entire tapestry, one may be able to discern the pattern in spite of the holes. The original version of this article has been withdrawn and replaced by this one which has been extensively revised to reflect more recent conclusions concerning relationships of the Gentry family as a whole. It particularly takes into account changes proposed in this journal for the family of David-II Gentry<1>, including the speculation that Nathaniel was a son of David<2>.

Records Relating to Nathaniel Gentry in Surry County, North Carolina
The first record of a Nathaniel Gentry is in the 1782 tax list of Surry County, North Carolina<3>. In that year, Nathaniel and four other Gentrys later associated with South Carolina, were listed in Capt. Martin's district. Nathaniel and three of these other Gentrys, Hezekiah and Hezekiah's sons Robert and "Runnel" (a spelling variation of "Reynolds"), were taxed only for the horses they owned, and possessed neither land nor cows for which other Gentrys in the district were taxed. The fourth Gentry, besides Nathaniel Gentry, with a South Carolina connection, was Samuel Gentry, owner of 400 acres of land as well as horses and cows. Samuel eventually went to South Carolina where he died in around 1800, but he is known to have lived in Surry County until shortly before 1790. He was a permanent resident of Surry County at the time of the tax listing as opposed to the apparently transient presence of Nathaniel, Hezekiah, and Hezekiah's sons. Hezekiah had also appeared briefly in the 1768 tax list for Rowan County, North Carolina, shortly before Surry County was formed from this county. There are no other references in any North Carolina records to these individuals before or after 1782. It seems apparent that the four men were visiting North Carolina in that year and living with Gentry relatives during their stay, perhaps prospecting for possible new land formerly held by Loyalists.

Nathaniel Gentry in Spartanburg County/District, South Carolina
The next series of records concerning Nathaniel were in Spartanburg County/District, South Carolina. [Note. Following the Revolutionary War, South Carolina was organized into seven districts which were subdivided into counties, each with a county court. Ninety-Six District spanned the entire northwest corner of the state and was expanded in 1786 when Greenville County and Pendleton County were organized out of former Indian lands. An Act of 1798-1799 abolished county courts. Thereafter each of the counties in Ninety-Six District was designated a District, with a separate District Circuit Court. On 1 Jan 1800, Spartan County became interchangeably Spartan District and Spartanburgh District. Through usage and time, the "h" in Spartanburgh was dropped, and the name evolved to Spartanburg. South Carolina retained this practice of naming its sub-divisions as "districts" rather than "counties" until 1868. We shall use the title "district" for records subsequent to 1799 or for non-specific use, otherwise use the title "county". ]


Ninety-Six District, SC, 1790
(shaded areas added
from Indian Lands)

The few records involving Nathaniel can be summarized in a few lines of text:

  • 1786 Nathaniel listed in an index for South Carolina land grants for 170 acres on the Tyger River<4a>.
  • 1790 Included in Federal census with eight members in his household (2 males over 21; 3 males less than 21; 3 females) [the census was actually conducted in South Carolina in 1791(Spartanburg return is dated 16 May 1791) rather than 1790]<5>.1791 "Nansey Gentry" (assumed to be a misspelling or misreading of "Nathaniel"), witnessed a sale of land on the middle branch of the Tyger River in Spartanburg County<6a>.
  • 1792 Nathaniel entered into a deed of bondage [a mortgage] for 100 acres of land on the South fork of the Tyger River. Boundary marking witnessed by Allen Gentry (and others)<6b>.
  • 1793 Another index of South Carolina land holdings included Nathaniel with 534 acres of land on the Pacolet River in Greenville County, South Carolina<4b>. [Pacolet River rises in Greenville County, then enters and flows across the full width of Spartanburg County.]
All further references to a Nathaniel Gentry in Spartanburg District are much later in time and are to an obviously younger man who is assumed to have been a son of Nathaniel's Spartanburg neighbor, Samuel Gentry.

Nathaniel Gentry in Pulaski County, Kentucky
There is only one subsequent reference to a Nathaniel Gentry that could logically be for the Nathaniel who lived in South Carolina. This is in the 1810 census for Pulaski County, Kentucky in which the household listed for Nathaniel contained a man and wife born before 1765 along with twelve other individuals<7>. We will have more to say about these individuals later. For the moment, it is enough to suggest:

  • Nathaniel, as the head of house, was the man who was over 45 years of age at the time.
  • We will assume that at least the majority of the other members of the household were children, spouses, and grandchildren of Nathaniel.
  • The lack of any further reference to this family in the 1820 census in Kentucky or any of the surrounding states, suggests that Nathaniel probably died between 1810 and 1820, and that his family scattered to locations other than Pulaski County.

Proposals for Family of Nathaniel Gentry
If we assume that all of the individuals enumerated with Nathaniel in the 1790 Federal census, we can propose a family at that point in time that contained:

Nathaniel and presumably his spouse
One son over 16 years of age (i.e. born before 1774 [1775 correcting for census date])
Three sons less than 16 years of age (i.e. born 1774 - 1790 [1791])
Two daughters of indeterminate age.

Can we add to this family? The first place to look for additional members is within Spartanburg District -- either still living there in 1790 or previous residents of the district who had moved on. During the period preceding and including the census, in addition to Nathaniel there were references to the following Gentrys:
   1779 Hezekiah, John, and Nicholas Gentry included in a listing by the South Carolina General Assembly of persons in Ninety-Six District that were liable for jury or other court duty<8>.
   1780 Richard Gentry enlisted in the South Carolina Militia while living along the Tyger River in Union County [adjoining Spartanburg]<10>.
   1789 Nicholas Gentry called for jury duty in Spartanburgh County Court<9a>.
   1789 Samuel Gentry appeared as a plaintiff in Spartanburgh County Court<9b>.
   1790 Allen "Jentry", "Sam'l Jentry", Tyre "Jentry", and Samuel Gentry listed in Federal census for Spartanburgh County<5>.

Let us deal with these one by one. By 1790, Hezekiah and John Gentry, whom we can identify as sons of David-II Gentry, were living in Edgefield District. Nicholas Gentry, a son of Nicholas Gentry of Surry County, North Carolina, had moved to Tennessee. Richard Gentry was a veteran of the Revolutionary War whose record is contained in his application for military benefite. There is no information as to where he settled after the war, but by 1792 he had moved to Surry County, North Carolina, where he was married In any case, Richard testified as to his birth in December 1755 in Lunenburg County, Virginia. This is almost twenty years before the oldest of Nathaniel's known sons so we consider him too old to be a member of Nathaniel's family.

Allen Gentry, a younger Nicholas Gentry, and one of the two Samuel Gentrys can be accounted for as one family. From an 1801 deed in Surry County, North Carolina, we find that "Allen Gentry, Nicholas Gentry, Jeremiah Gentry and Samuel Gentry, joint heirs of Samuel Gentry, dec'd, of the State of South Carolina" disposed of 400 acres of land owned by their father in North Carolina. Allen Gentry and "Samuel Gentry" of the 1790 census represent one of these sons and the balance of the family just prior to Samuel's death. We shall refer to this Samuel as "Samuel Gentry the Elder". The Nicholas who was called for jury duty is also assumed to be one of these sons.

We are left with two Gentrys for whom we have not yet accounted. The Samuel who was listed in the census as "Sam'l Jentry" is believed to be a brother of the 1779 Nicholas, a son of Nicholas Gentry of North Carolina. We shall refer to this Samuel as "Samuel Gentry the Younger". The census listing for this family included in addition to Samuel, two males older than 16, two males younger than 16, and five females, one of whom is assumed to have been Samuel's spouse, Frances. It seems obvious that this family was one that paralleled Nathaniel's in age and none of them could be considered as part of the latter's family.

Finally, we are left with "Tyre Jentry", with the only reference to him within the district being the census report. For years there has been controversy and uncertainty as to the actual spalling of this individual's first name, and it is commonly reported as "Tigak". Close examination of the original census report shows the name to be ink-smeared and probably over-written by the census taker. Optical manipulation of copies of the original are consistent with the possibility that the name was actually "Tyre" or "Tyree". Descendants of a Tyre Gentry family that lived in Franklin County, Georgia between 1800 and 1805, and subsequently moved to Tennessee and Arkansas are satisfied that this represents the first reference to their ancestor. [For further details relating to this identification, and for more information about Tyre's family, readers are referred to an article by Tom J. Gentry in a previous issue of the Gentry Journal<11>.]

The census reports for this family, a husband (Tyre) and wife, one son less than sixteen years of age, and a second female. This is certainly consistent with known family facts which include:

Tyre said to be born 20 Apr 1766
William son born 1788 in South Carolina
Mildred daughter born 1791 in South Carolina (with the delayed reporting of the 1790 census, Mildred would have just barely been included in the census).
We propose Tyre as being a very good candidate as a son of Nathaniel.

The remaining 1790 census returns in South Carolina involving Gentrys were for Edgefield and Pendleton Counties. All of these involved the family of David-II Gentry, youngest son of Nicholas-I. Sons of David in the census included "Hez'h Jentrey" (Hezekiah), "John Jentrey", "Simon Jentrey", and "Cane Gentrey" (Allen Cain) in Edgefield County, and David Gentry Jr. in Pendleton County. Two sons of Hezekiah, Robert and Reynolds and one son of Cain, ("Jon' Gentry") were also listed in Edgefield County. Across the Savannah River in Wilkes County, Georgia, tax lists for 1790 add the names of two other sons of David Sr. living there, namely Elisha and Elijah. None of these are possible additions to Nathaniel's family.

From the facts printed above we can propose a preliminary outline of Nathaniel Gentry's family.

  • If Tyre was born in April 1766 and was the oldest child of Nathaniel and his wife,
  • Nathaniel was probably married in late 1764 or possibly early 1765. Assuming the normal age for men to be married at that time, Nathaniel was probably born between about 1740 (possibly earlier) to perhaps 1743. This is well within the range of birthdates for children of David-II Gentry, Nathaniel's proposed father.
  • Son Tyre (or Tyree) was probably the oldest child.
  • Son born between 1766 and 1774. If we assume that this was the same son that accompanied Nathaniel to Kentucky, his pregnant wife must have been in the South Carolina census as well because the couple probably had at least two children in the fyears between 1791 and 1794.
  • Three Sons born between 1774 and 1791.
  • A Daughter probably born after 1770 (otherwise she was likely to have been married by 1790).
  • For reasons which will become apparent later, it is possible Nathaniel and his wife had at least one more child after the 1790 census, namely a Son born perhaps 1791-1793.
These children represent perhaps a little longer interval of time than for many families, but assumed birth intervals are not unreasonable. There may also have been a child who died in infancy, or an older daughter, born before 1774,who married before the enumerating of the census report and left home.

Speculations as to Identity of Nathaniel Gentry's Sons
The children listed above represent what little we know about Nathaniel's family while he was living in South Carolina and before he moved to Kentucky. We have proposed Tyre as a son of Nathaniel and specifically the oldest son. The 1790 census report leaves us with at least four other sons to be identified. The oldest of these, born before 1774, was probably the son that accompanied Nathaniel to Pulaskia County, Kentucky. We will discuss his family in more detail below, but for the moment it is sufficient to say that he appears to have had at least two children by 1794. If this son was living with Nathaniel in 1791, surely he would have been married at the time and have had his wife living with him. For this reason we have included this wife in the listing for Nathaniel's family above. In Spartanburg County records there is a brief reference to a Matthew Gentry who was a defendant in the county court in 1796. His name appeared twice in relation to that case, confirming the name of the individual involved<9c,d>. He was nowhere mentioned again. Certainly, later Spartanburg District records indicate that he was not a part of Samuel Gentry the Younger's household. We suggest that Matthew was Nathaniel's second son and that he was born about 1768 to 1770.

A second suggestion for a son of Nathaniel is a David Gentry who was reported in Greenville District in the 1800 South Carolina census<10>. David was reported to have been born between 1774 and 1784 and had a newly-married wife of the same age and no children. Some weight is added to this proposal by the fact that Nathaniel received a grant for land in Greenvillle District iin 1793 and he may have moved his family there at that time. Considering the fact that David appears to have been just newly-married, his date of birth was probably about 1776 to 1778. There is no further reference to any Gentrys using or disposing of the Greenville land, and David himself was only mentioned in South Carolina records in that one census report. It is very possible that this was the David Gentry ("Jentry") who was mentioned in a Baldwin County, Alabama, 1820 state census with two males > 21; 1 male < 21; 1 female > 21; and 1 female < 21. There is also a record of the marriage of David Gentry to Nancy Highland (a widow) in Baldwin County in 1820.

Later Movements of Nathaniel
Before completing our proposals as to Nathaniel's family, it will be helpful to follow him north to his presumed final residence in Kentucky. We have no information as to when Nathaniel left South Carolina to go to Kentucky, but he was missing from the 1800 census. The last record of anyone in his presumed family in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, was in 1796 when Matthew appeared in court. Some time within the next few years it is probable that the family moved north. Nathaniel stopped in Pulaski County, on the southern border of Kentucky and as we have already said, was listed in the census for that county in 1810. Perhaps coincidentally, during part of the time period Nathaniel was moving north, two Richards were moving to Kentucky from Surry County, One of these Richards was also in the 1810 Pulaski County census with Nathaniel and is thought to be the son of Richard-III Gentry, son of Samuel-II. The other Richard was the Revolutionary War veteran that had enlisted in the South Carolina militia in 1780 from Union District, South Carolina, whom we have already mentions. After the war, he moved to Surry County, North Carolina in about 1790 where he met and married his wife. He left there in 1801 and lived for a time in Lincoln County, Kentucky, before moving on permanently to Rockcastle County, Kentucky. It may have been coincidence, or it is possible these families had been in communication and reported to each other as to the possibilities for new land in Kentucky.

Just to the north of Pulaski County, in Lincoln County, at the same time as Nathaniel was moving north, two Gentrys appeared for the first time. In 1803, Isham (also spelled Isom) Gentry married Elizabeth Lunsford<12>. This was followed by a number of tax records in Lincoln County for Isham/Isom Gentry in successive years from 1805 to 1809<13>. The tax for 1809 includes three parcels of land totalling 450 acres of land on the Dix River (which runs parallel to almost the entire length of the border between Lincoln County and Garrard County). In 1810, Isham appeared in the Lincoln County census with his wife and three young daughters. The census reported Isham as born before 1784. Based upon the year of his marriage, Isham was probably born in about 1780 His wife was slightly younger and was probably born about 1784, meaning she had married at about age nineteen. The couple were present again in the 1820 Lincoln County census. Marriage records for Lincoln County show the marriage in 1824 of Polly Gentry to David McCullum and in 1825 of Casandra Gentry to George McAfee. Both marriages list as bondsman, a "J. Sam" Gentry as father. This surely is someone's misreading of the name "Isom" Gentry. Isham received a grant of 200 acres of land along the Rockcastle River in April 1830 but he was not in the census for that year. His family next appeared in the 1840 census for Platte County, Missouri, under the name "Isom". An assumed son, "Isom" Jr., was in the 1850 Platte County census but the senior Isham presumably had died by then. Isom Jr. moved on to Kansas from Missouri and was known as "I. B." Gentry rather than Isom.

In addition to Isham, the Lincoln County records show the marriage of a John Gentry in 1809 to Rebecca Richards. There are no land or tax records for John, but he was included in the 1810 Lincoln County census. His date of birth was reported in the census as 1784 to 1794. John was missing as a separate entry in the 1820 census, but is presumed to have been the extra adult male living with his brother Isham at the time of the census.. We can surmise that John had lost his wife and had not remarried. In 1835, the Lincoln County records show a marriage of a John B. Gentry to Sally B. King with Sally's father serving as a bondsman. This is presumably the same John Gentry finally re-marrying years after his first wife died. John was listed in the Lincoln County census in 1840 with this wife and a very young child. The census shows both John and his wife as having been born after 1790. It is probable that he was the youngest of the sons of Nathaniel Gentry listed in the 1791 census, so we can probably narrow John's date of birth to specifically the year 1790.

We suggest that these two Gentrys, Isham and John, were sons of Nathaniel and were the two youngest sons that were included in the South Carolina census. They cannot be linked in any way to the Gentrys that were present in 1800 in nearby Green and Madison Counties. The few families there were all sons or grandson of Nicholas-II Gentry. There were some Johns among Nicholas' descendants, but nowhere has the name Isham been mentioned among them. There is no record existing to show where they were born, but we suggest that they accompanied or preceded their father in his move to Kentucky, presumably in about 1800. While Nathaniel settled with his son Matthew and the latter's family in Pulaski County, the two younger sons went on a little father north and settled in Lincoln County.

Hypotheses Relating to Matthew Gentry
This leads us now to the family that was living with Nathaniel in Kentucky in 1810. We suggest that this was the family of his hypothetical son, Matthew. The only evidence we have as to his name is the record of two court appearances by him in the Spartanburg County Court in 1796. We have found no other evidence for Matthew himself or his wife. There were no members of Nathaniel's family present in Pulaski County in 1820, and there are no land records, marriages, court records or the like for any Gentrys in that period of time.

The Pulaski County household was a large one which included besides Nathaniel (and his wife):

Our presumed Matthew, an adult male born 1765 to 1784
No likely wife of Matthew, thus she is presumed to have died.
Three boys and a girl born 1784 to 1794. We shall want to discuss these in a little more detail shortly.
Two younger boys born 1794 to 1800.
Four boys and a girl born 1800 to 1810.

A diagrammatic representation of this family's record of birth-year ranges is shown below.

Table of Census Ages for Nathaniel and Matthew Gentry Famiies
Individual/Year 17 70    17 80    17 90    18 00    18 10    18 20    18 30    18 40
(Census)
Nathaniel
M )< -   (1790)
>16
  (1810)
>45
(1820)
 
(1830)
 
(1840) 
   Spouse F )< - - -   Yes   >45      
   Daughter F < - - -   Yes   xxx      
   David M (------- ) <16     30-40    
   Isham M   (--) <16   26-45 26-45 ??? 50-60
   John M     (--)   16-26 26-45 ??? 40-50
   Son? M     (--)   16-26      
   Dau/Law ? F   ?-- ---)   16-26      
Matthew M <-)   >16   26-45      
   Spouse ? F < - - -   Yes   xxx      
   Son ? M     (--)   16-26      
   Son ? M     (--)   16-26      
   Son ? M        (------)   10-16      
   Zimri M        (------)   10-16 <21 30-40 40-50
      (Spouse) F           Yes 30-40 30-40
   Daughter ? F       (--------) 0-10      
   Levi M       (--------) 0-10   20-30 30-40
   Son ? M       (--------) 0-10      
   Son ? M       (--------) 0-10      
   Son ? M       (--------) 0-10      

(Ranges for birth-years shown by (--) are shown in relation to the time grid. The age groupings found in the census for Matthew's part of Nathaniel's family (in 1790 and 1810) and for the other families (in 1820-1840) are displayed in the column after the census year. Unidentified children of Matthew are placed arbitrarily within age groupings.). The six younger children are all of an age consistent with them being children of Matthew and his wife (although one of the youngest could have been a grandson or granddaughter). The older family members are of an awkward, indeterminant age. We propose that they represent:
    One son of Nathaniel and his wife (their youngest).
    A son of Matthew (his oldest) and this son's wife.
    A second son of Matthew.

It will be recalled in discussing Nathaniel's family as of 1791, that we proposed that Matthew and his wife were living with Nathaniel at the time, but that none of the other children listed at that time were those of Matthew. In the Kentucky census we find three boys apparently born between 1791 and 1794. It is more logical that one of these was a son of Nathaniel and the other two were sons of Matthew (although of course they could have been triplets). The presence of a wife of one of these young men is completely logical considering the ages of the individuals, rather than this being a case of the boys having a sister.

Most of the children of Matthew we have not been able to identify, but we do have a suggestion as to two of them. As an extension of our speculations concerning Matthew, we now consider the case of two Gentrys who appeared in the 1830 census for St. Clair County, Illinois, namely Yimri and Levi Gentry, living in close proximity to each other.. This was all the way across Kentucky and up a short distance along the Mississippi River opposite St. Louis. Ten years earlier, in neighboring Washington County, Illinois, a Zimriah Gentry was listed in the 1820 Illinois state census with two family members, but was not in the federal census. This Zimriah was listed as less than 21 years of age but appeared to have a wife and child so must have been just short of that age--born perhaps in 1800. Moving forward ten years from 1830, Zimri had moved to Greene County, Illinois, where he was listed in the 1840 census, and Levi had moved to Wayne County, Missouri. In 1850, this same Levi Gentry was again listed in Wayne County with an age of 44, born in South Carolina (in about 1805 or 1806), and with a son named Zimri. Such a correspondence of unusual names certainly suggest that the later Levi must have been the same individual as in the 1830 census, and also suggests that both of the 1830 men may have come from South Carolina. It was unusual for South Carolinians to wind up in southern Illinois and there is no obvious alternate source for Yimri and Levi other than to have come there by way of Kentucky. Levi's wife was born in Illinois and his oldest son was born in Missouri in about 1833 so Levi must have married in Illinois and left between 1830 and 1833. Both Zimri and Levi can be easily explained in respect to age as being part of Matthew Gentry's family. Levi's date of birth is after the time that Matthew is thought to have left South Carolina, but Levi's age may have been reported wrong, or Matthew's wife may have been in South Carolina for some reason at the time of Levi's birth, or Nathaniel and Matthew's move north was actually a number of years after Isham (and John?) moved to Kentucky.

There were two other Gentrys in St. Clair County in 1830, living in a different part of the county. Their ages would permit them to have been children of our hypothetical Matthew, but their names suggest otherwise. Bartlet in particular was likely to have been related to the Bartlet Gentrys of Tennessee rather than to Matthew. In any case, we do not suggest them as being part of the family we are trying to identify. There are no other Gentrys we can suggest as being part of this family so we will have to leave the question unresolved.

Conclusion
We have presented here in considerable detail (probably far more than the reader may want) our efforts to piece together many disparate facts concerning a number of Gentry families that we believe fit together to make a logical whole. We once again emphasize that the proposals for the family of Nathaniel Gentry represent a combination of many hypotheses, very few of which can be supported by solid documentary evidence. On the other hand, there is no conflicting evidence for these speculations. We believe the sum total of these hypotheses form a logical tapestry of probabilities that future research may show to be in error in a few details, but overall represent a plausible picture of that early pioneer, Nathaniel Gentry.

References
1. "THE SONS OF NICHOLAS-I GENTRY, David Gentry and Family"
Journal of Gentry Genealogy, vol 2, issue 5, (Aug 2008) (revised)

2. "NICHOLAS GENTRY THE IMMIGRANT, Revised Proposals Concerning his Family" Journal of Gentry Genealogy, issue 2011A, (Feb 2011)

3. Tax Lists (originals from State Archives)
    References from NC State Archives, Raleigh, NC,
 
Year Name Acres White
Polls
Black
Polls
Livestock
1782 Joseph Gentry 150 1    
  Allen Gentry 200     3 horses, 5 cows
  Artha Gentry       4 horses, 3 cows
  Artha Gentry       4 horses, 3 cows
  Richard Gentry 200     3 horses, 4 cows
  Hezekiah Gentry       3 horses
  Samuel Gentry 400     3 horses, 6 cows
  Robert Gentry       1 horse
  Runnel Gentry       2 horses
  Nathaniel Gentry       1 horse
  Joseph Gentry 150     3 horses, 10 cows
  Shelton Gentry       2 horses, 2 cows
  Samuel Gentry 150     5 horses, 5 cows
  Samuel Gentry 120      
  Nicholas Gentry 150     3 horses, 9 cows
  Nicholas Gentry 150      

4. Leonardo Andrea, "Gentry Family" Manuscript on microfilm compiled by,Columbia, SC for Mrs. John F. Gannon, Montgomery, AL.
    a. Index II for land grants shows:
        Hezekiah Gentry, 241 ac on Indian Crk in 96 Dist, 6 Feb 1784;
        Hezekiah Gentry, 100 ac, same location, 6 Mar 1784;
        Hezekiah Gentry, 197 1/2 ac on Bogins Crk, 5 Jan 1784.
        Nathaniel Gentry, 170 ac on Tyger River, 2 Oct 1786;

    b. Index III shows:
        Hezekiah Gentry, 77 ac on Indian Creek in 96 Dist, 6 Feb 1796
        Hezekiah Gentry, 77 ac in 96 Dist, 6 Feb 1797 [duplicate of above?];
        David Gentry, 50 ac in 96 Dist, 4 Oct 1790;
        David Gentry, 101 ac in 96 Dist, 5 Dec 1791;
        Nathaniel Gentry, 534 ac on Pacolet River, Greenville Co., 4 Feb 1793;

   c. Land plats indexed after the Revolution show:
        Cain Gentry, in Abbeville Dist. in 1808;
        David Gentry, 2 in 96 Dist in 1790;
        Hezekiah Gentry, 4 in 96 Dist, 1784-1795;
        Levi Gentry, in Edgefield Dist., 1802;
        Nathaniel Gentry, 2 in 96 Dist., 1785 and 1792.

5. 1790 Federal Census, South Carolina
 
Ninety-Six Dist, Spartanburgh Co. M(>16) M(<16) F
p.86 Gentry, Nathaniel 233
p.86 Gentry, Samuel 325
p.86 Jentry, Tyreh 112
p.86 Jentry, Allen 102
p.87 Jentry, Sam'l 221

6. Albert Bruce Pruitt, "Spartanburg County/District, South Carolina, Deed Abstracts, Books A-T (1785-1827)", by Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC, 1988
a.  1791 Jun 10 Bk(F-150) (p.152)
  Nansey Gentry (misreading of "Nathaniel"?) witnessed deed for sale of land on middle fork of Tyger R. known as Long Br.
b.  1792 Nov 23 Bk(F-316) (p.168)
  Nathaniel Gentry (Spartanburg) to Zabulon Bragg (same); bond of 200 pounds for deed to be made in 15 years for 100 ac on S. fork Tyger R; borders a pine tree Nathaniel sawed in the presence of Allen Gentry (and others).

7.  Federal Census for 1800 - 1850
1800 Federal Census Born->
   Sex
1790-
 1800
1784-
 1790
1774-
 1784
1755-
 1774
Bef
1755
 
Greenville District, South Carolina
Page
255
David Gentry
  (son of Nathaniel?)
M
F
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
 
 
1810 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1800-
 1810
1794-
 1800
1784-
 1794
1765-
 1784
Bef
1765
 
Lincoln County, Kentucky
Page
117
Isham Gentry
  (son of Nathaniel?)
M
F
0
3
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
 
117 John Gentry
  (son of Nathaniel?)
M
F
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
 
Pulaski County, Kentucky
Page
146
Nathaniel Gentry
  (w/Matthew?)
M
F
4
1
2
0
3
1
1
0
1
1
 
 
1820 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1810-
 1820
1804-
 1810
1802-
 1804
1794-
 1804
1775-
 1794
Bef.
1775
Lincoln County, Kentucky
Page
77
Isham Gentry M
F
1
2
0
1
0 0
1
2
1
0
0

1830 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1825-
1830
1820-
1825
1815-
1820
1810-
1815
1800-
1810
1790-
1800
1780-
1790
bef
1780
St. Clair County, Illinois
Page
126
Yimri Gentry
  (son of Matthew?)
M
F
0
3
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
Page
126
Levi Gentry
  (son of Matthew?)
M
F
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
50-60
 
1840 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1835-
1840
1830-
1835
1825-
1830
1820-
1825
1810
1820
1800-
1810
1790-
1800
bef.
1790
Platte County, Missouri
Page
143
Isom Gentry M
F
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
50-60
50-60
Lincoln County, Kentucky
Page
119
John Gentry M
F
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
Greene County, Illinois
Page
95
Zimry Gentry M
F
1
2
1
2
1
2
0
2
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
Wayne County, Missouri
Page
224
Levi H. Gentry M
F
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
 
1850 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1845-
1850
1840-
1845
1835-
1840
1830-
1835
1820-
1830
1810-
1820
1800-
1810
bef.
1800
Platte County, Missouri
Page
408
Isom Gentry
   Sarah
M
F
5/4
--
8/7/6
--
--
--
--
--
29 KY
29
--
--
--
--
--
--
Wayne County, Missouri
Page
201
Levi H. Gentry
   Gracy A.
M
F
--
4/1
8/6
--
14
12/19
17
--
--
--
--
35
44 SC
--
--
--

8. South Carolina General Assembly Ordinance, MS Act No. 1123, 20 Feb 1779,
     p.80, 101     Hezekiah Gentry     Spartan District      liable for grand/petit jury
     p.88, 104     John Gentry            Spartan District      liable for grand/petit jury
     p.89             Nicholas Gentry      Cuffey Town & Turkey Creek      liable for court service

9. Brent H. Holcomb, "Spartanburgh County, South Carolina, Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1799", Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC, 1980.
a.  1789 March Court [p.91]  
  Nicholas Gentry [son of Samuel Elder?] selected to serve on jury for Sept. court.
b.  1789 Mar 18 [p.96]  
  Samuel Jentry against John Chesney. Case.
Ordered, that this suit be dismissed at the Plaintiff's costs.
c.  1794 Jan 15 [p.188]  
  The County against Samuel Jentry. "Qui Tam" [tax question?].
For a Brown mare, by request of the defendant this case is continued, until next court.
d.  1796 Jan 16 [p.221]  
  James Tanner & George Walker against Matthew Gentry. Appeal.
Ordered that the Judgment of the Justice below be recorded.
e.  1796 Jul 16 [p.222]  
  Alexander McBeth & Co. against Matthew Gentry. Petition.
Settled by the defendant in open court.

10. "Index of Revolutionary War Pension Applications", National Genealogical Society, Washington, DC, 1976
 
GENTRY, Richard, SC, b.VA, Justina/Jestin, W8844, BLWt26713-160-55.
Revolutionary War Pension reference (National Archives microfilm)
File W8844, (BLWt 26713-160-55): Richard GENTRY, widow Justina or Gestin, of Rockcastle Co. KY
Credited with 13 months service as a private in SC militia.

11. "Tyree Gentry", Journal of Gentry Genealogy, vol. 2, issue #11, (Nov 2002)

12. "Lincoln Co., Kentucky Marriages"
 
1803 Sep 12 Isham Gentry Elizabeth Lunsford bond. Wm. Preston
1809 Jan 16 John Gentry Rebecca Richards bond. Benjamin Warren
1824 Apr 21 Polly Gentry David McCullum bond J Sam. [Isom] Gentry
(father)
1825 Dec 20 Casandra Gentry George McAfee bond J Sam. [Isom] Gentry
(father)
1835 Aug 17 John B. Gentry Sally B. King bond. Samuel Hocker
father Hobart King

13. "Kentucky Landholders, 1787-1811", Tennessee State Library & Archives.
 
1805 Jul 22 Bk(1-07) Isom/Isham Gentry  
1806 Aug 11 Bk(1-10)     "  
1807 May 25 Bk(1-09)     "  
1808 Jun 9 Bk(1-13)     "  
1809 May 10 Bk(2-16)     "  
  Bk(1-28)     " 350 ac on Dicks [Dix] R.
      50 ac     "
      50 ac     "

2/14/11


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