JOURNAL OF GENTRY
GENEALOGY
Issue 2011(B)
November 2011
Home Page and Index

SPECULATIONS ON THE FAMILY OF
NATHANIEL GENTRY


Of South Carolina and Kentucky


by
Willard Gentry
(Replacement of Issue 2006(C), Revisions April 2015)

Introduction
Only a handful of references exist concerning the Nathaniel Gentry who lived in Spartanburg District in South Carolina in the years before 1800 and who seems to be the same Nathaniel Gentry as appeared in the 1810 census in Pulaski County, Kentucky. Yet enough information can be inferred from the record that we can surmise that he was one of the patriarchs of the third generation of Gentrys. The purpose of this article to present a series of speculations, that taken together, will present a cohesive and logical picture of Nathaniel and his family. We can liken this to a long-neglected tapestry hanging on the wall, speckled throughout with moth holes. At close range, if one were to try to make out the details of the pattern, there are far too many holes to perceive them. At a distance, looking at a much broader view of the entire tapestry, one may be able to discern the pattern in spite of the holes.
The original version of this article has been withdrawn and replaced by this one which has been extensively revised to reflect more recent conclusions concerning relationships of the Gentry family as a whole. The article has been revised a second time to take into account information that has been developed concerning the previously unrecognized families of Matthew Gentry, who has been proposed as a son of Nathaniel, and a proposed brother of Matthew, Reason Gentry.

Early Life of Nathaniel Gentry


Nathaniel was probably born about 1740 in Hanover County, Virginia. There is no definitive evidence as to the identity of Nathaniel's father. Conjecture, speculation, "educated guesswork", whatever you want to call it suggests that his father most likely was Samuel Gentry, son of Nicholas Gentry, the Immigrant. This has been discussed in more detail in an earlier issue of the Gentry Journal<1>. Samuel spent most of his younger years in Hanover County, Virginia, then in 1742 received a grant of land in Louisa County, settling along a small stream with the unappealing name of Dirty Swamp. Presumably Nathaniel was born shortly before this move. In about 1750, preceded by his sons Nicholas, Joseph and William, he moved with most of rest of his family to Lunenburg County.

With Nicholas Gentry in the lead again, most of the Samuel Gentry family left Lunenburg County for North Carolina between 1765 and 1770, drawn by vacant land made available by the termination of the so-called Granville District Land Grants that restricted access to a wide band of territory just south of the Virginia border. Nicholas and his brothers Joseph, Richard, and William all moved to Surry County, North Carolina; Allen and his father, went to Caswell County, North Carolina.

There was virtually no record of Samuel Jr. during this time and there are suggestions that he may have remained for a further period of time in the Lunenburg-Mecklenburg County area of Virginia. Eventually he joined his brothers in Surry County, North Carolina, filed for a land grant there, then left it to move to what became Spartanburg District, South Carolina. As for Nathaniel, there have been absolutely no references found to him until 1782 when he appeared in the tax records of Surry County, North Carolina<2>. This writer speculates that during most of this time he was with his hypothesized brother, Samuel, staying in Virginia for a time, then moving to South Carolina.

The Surry County tax record also includes Hezekiah and Hezekiah's two oldest sons, "Runnels" (a spelling variation of Reynolds) and Robert. Hezekiah, his sons, and Nathaniel were present in the county long enough to be taxed for their horses, but were not taxed for any cows or land as were the other Gentrys in the tax list. Reading between the lines, their presence in North Carolina may have been due to the fact that in the second half of 1780, Robert Gentry, and two younger brothers, Hezekiah Jr. and William served for short periods of time in the Loyalist militia. This militia had been organized by the British General Cornwallis after the capture of Charleston, to support his base of supply there and to provide control of the countryside as Cornwallis' armies advanced inland to occupy South Carolina. After Cornwallis' defeat at Yorktown, in October 1781, the newly- established South Carolina Legislature passed the Confiscation Act of 1782 by which land was taken from some 200 Loyalist sympathizers. Many hundreds of other Loyalists had no land confiscated but were persona non grata to their neighbors. Because Nathaniel was with Hezekiah in North Carolina, he may have shown Loyalist sympathies also and both families felt unwanted in South Carolina. Their Loyalist activities were apparently not strong enough to prevent them from going back home within the following year. It was not long before Nathaniel and Hezekiah acquired land grants and appeared to be in the good graces of the authorities.

Nathaniel Gentry in Spartanburg County/District, South Carolina


The next series of records concerning Nathaniel were in Spartanburg County/District, South Carolina. [Note. We have discussed in earlier articles some of the history of the organizing of counties in western South Carolina. In particular, this included naming the governmental entities, "districts" rather than "counties". On 1 Jan 1800, Spartan County became interchangeably Spartan District and Spartanburgh District. Through usage and time, the "h" in Spartanburgh was dropped, and the name evolved to Spartanburg. South Carolina retained this practice of naming its sub-divisions as "districts" rather than "counties" until 1868. We shall use the title "district" for records subsequent to 1799 or for non-specific use, otherwise use the title "county". ]


Ninety-Six District, SC, 1790
(shaded areas added from Indian Lands)

The few records involving Nathaniel can be summarized in a few lines of text:

All further references to a Nathaniel Gentry in Spartanburg District are much later in time and are to an obviously younger man who is assumed to have been a son of Nathaniel's Spartanburg neighbor, Samuel Gentry.
 

Nathaniel Gentry in Pulaski County, Kentucky


There is only one subsequent reference to a Nathaniel Gentry that could logically be for the Nathaniel who lived in South Carolina. This is in the 1810 census for Pulaski County, Kentucky in which the household listed for Nathaniel contained a man and woman born before 1765 along with twelve other individuals<13>. We will have more to say about these individuals later. For the moment, it is enough to suggest:

Proposals for Family of Nathaniel Gentry


Based upon the individuals enumerated with Nathaniel in the 1790 Federal census, we can propose a family at that point in time that contained:
Nathaniel and presumably his spouse
One son over 16 years of age (i.e. born before 1774 [1775 correcting for census date]) and probably a spouse
Three sons less than 16 years of age (i.e. born 1774 - 1790 [1791])
One daughter of indeterminate age.

Can we add to this family? The first place to look for additional members is within Spartanburg District -- either still living there in 1790 or previous residents of the district who had moved on. During the period preceding and including the census, in addition to Nathaniel there were references to the following Gentrys:
   1779 Hezekiah, John, and Nicholas Gentry included in a listing by the South Carolina General Assembly of persons in Ninety-Six District that were liable for jury or other court duty<6>.
   1780 Richard Gentry enlisted in the South Carolina Militia while living along the Tyger River in Union County [adjoining Spartanburg]<8>.
   1789 Nicholas Gentry called for jury duty in Spartanburgh County Court<8a>.
   1789 Samuel Gentry appeared as a plaintiff in Spartanburgh County Court<8b>.
   1790 Allen "Jentry", "Sam'l Jentry", Tyre "Jentry", and Samuel Gentry listed in Federal census for Spartanburgh County<4>.

Let us deal with these one by one. By 1790, Hezekiah and John Gentry, whom we can identify as sons of David-II Gentry, were living in Edgefield District. Richard Gentry was a veteran of the Revolutionary War whose record is contained in his application for military benefits. There is no information as to where he settled after the war, but by 1792 he had moved to Surry County, North Carolina, where he was married. In any case, Richard testified as to his birth in December 1755 in Lunenburg County, Virginia. This is almost twenty years before the oldest of Nathaniel's known sons so we consider him too old to be a member of Nathaniel's family. Nicholas Gentry, a son of Nicholas Gentry of Surry County, North Carolina, had moved to Tennessee.

Allen Gentry, a younger Nicholas Gentry, and one of the two Samuel Gentrys can be accounted for as one family. From an 1801 deed in Surry County, North Carolina, we find that "Allen Gentry, Nicholas Gentry, Jeremiah Gentry and Samuel Gentry, joint heirs of Samuel Gentry, dec'd, of the State of South Carolina" disposed of 400 acres of land owned by their father in North Carolina. Allen Gentry and "Samuel Gentry" of the 1790 census represent one of these sons and the balance of the family just prior to Samuel's death. We shall refer to this Samuel as "Samuel Gentry the Elder". The Nicholas who was called for jury duty is also assumed to be one of these sons.

We are left with two Gentrys for whom we have not yet accounted. The Samuel who was listed in the census as "Sam'l Jentry" is believed to be a brother of the 1779 Nicholas, a son of Nicholas Gentry of North Carolina. We shall refer to this Samuel as "Samuel Gentry the Younger". The census listing for this family included in addition to Samuel, two males older than 16, two males younger than 16, and five females, one of whom is assumed to have been Samuel's spouse, Frances. It seems obvious that this family was one that paralleled Nathaniel's in age and none of them could be considered as part of the latter's family.

Finally, we are left with "Tyre Jentry", with the only reference to him within the district being the census report. For years there has been controversy and uncertainty as to the actual spelling of this individual's first name in the census, and it is commonly reported as "Tigak". Close examination of the original census report shows the name to be ink-smeared and probably over-written by the census taker. Digital manipulation of copies of the original are consistent with the possibility that the name was actually "Tyre" or "Tyree". Descendants of a Tyre Gentry family that lived in Franklin County, Georgia between 1800 and 1805, and subsequently moved to Tennessee and Arkansas are satisfied that this represents the first reference to their ancestor. [For further details relating to this identification, and for more information about Tyre's family, readers are referred to an article by Tom J. Gentry in a previous issue of the Gentry Journal<9>.]

The census reports for this family, a husband (Tyre) and wife, one son less than sixteen years of age, and a second female<4>. This is certainly consistent with known family facts which include:

Tyre         said to be born 20 Apr 1766
William     son born 1788 in South Carolina
Mildred     daughter born 1791 in South Carolina (with the delayed reporting of the 1790 census, Mildred would have just barely been included in the census).
We propose Tyre as being a very good candidate as a son, the oldest, of Nathaniel.

The remaining 1790 census returns in South Carolina involving Gentrys were for Edgefield and Pendleton Counties. All of these involved other members of the family of David-II. Sons of David in the census included "Hez'h Jentrey" (Hezekiah), "John Jentrey", "Simon Jentrey", and "Cane Gentrey" (Allen Cain) in Edgefield County, and David Gentry Jr. in Pendleton County. Two sons of Hezekiah, Robert and Reynolds and one son of Cain, ("Jon' Gentry") were also listed in Edgefield County. Across the Savannah River in Wilkes County, Georgia, tax lists for 1790 add the names of two other sons of David Sr. living there, namely Elisha and Elijah. None of these are possible additions to Nathaniel's family.

From the facts printed above we can propose a preliminary outline of Nathaniel Gentry's family.

South Carolina Clues as to Identity of Nathaniel Gentry's Sons
The children listed above represent what little we know about Nathaniel's family while he was living in South Carolina and before he moved to Kentucky. We have proposed Tyre as a son of Nathaniel and specifically the oldest son. The 1790 census report leaves us with at least four other sons to be identified. The oldest of these, born before 1774, undoubtedly accompanied Nathaniel to Pulaski County, Kentucky. We will discuss his family in more detail below, but for the moment it is sufficient to say that he appears to have had at least two children and perhaps three by 1794. If this son was living with Nathaniel in 1791, surely he would have been married at the time and have had his wife living with him. In addition it is possible the oldest of these sons had been born by 1791, replacing one of Nathaniel's sons in the census listing. For this reason we have included this wife in the listing for Nathaniel's family above. In Spartanburg County records there is a brief reference to a Matthew Gentry who was a defendant in the county court in 1796. His name appeared twice in relation to that case, confirming the name of the individual involved<8c,d>. He was nowhere mentioned again. Certainly, later Spartanburg District records indicate that he was not a part of Samuel Gentry the Younger's household. We suggest that Matthew was Nathaniel's second son and that he was born about 1768 to 1770.

Later Movements of Nathaniel
Before completing our proposals as to Nathaniel's family, it will be helpful to follow him north to his presumed final residence in Kentucky. We have no information as to when Nathaniel left South Carolina to go to Kentucky, but he was missing from the 1800 census. The last record of anyone in his presumed family in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, was in 1796 when Matthew appeared in court. Some time within the next few years it is probable that the family moved north to Pulaski County. Probably the route he took was by way of Surry County. From there, he would have followed the Boone Trail established by Daniel Boone from the Yadkin River in Surry County across the northern part of North Carolina to the Holston River in Tennessee. At that point, Nathaniel would have picked up Boone's Wilderness Trail through Cumberland Gap to his destination. This trail had been cleared by Daniel Boone also, and widened in 1792 to allow wagon traffic.

It would be interesting to know how much influence his Gentry relatives in Surry County had on his decision. For some reason, the years between 1800 and 1810 saw quite a number of migrations westward by the Surry County Gentrys. The family of Joseph Gentry's oldest son, Samuel, began moving to Kentucky by 1799 and Samuel himself was the last to move in 1807. Interestingly, seven of his sons moved eventually to Spencer and Warrick Counties, Indiana, on the Ohio River, adjacent to the counties in which Nathaniel's family is believed to have eventually settled. Richard Gentry's son, Richard Jr. was missing from the 1800 Surry County census and is believed to have left the county just before then. Because he wound up in Pulaski County along with Nathaniel it is very possible that they made arrangements in advance and traveled together. Nicholas Gentry's presumed son, Richard the War Veteran, had returned to Surry County where he was married and he also left during this period of time, going briefly to Lincoln County, Kentucky, then settling in Rockcastle County, Kentucky, adjoining Pulaski County. He also was missing from the 1800 Surry County census and is mentioned in a deed of sale of his land in 1801 as being "formerly of Surry County".

Nathaniel stopped in Pulaski County, on the southern border of Kentucky and as we have already said, was listed in the census for that county in 1810 along with what appear to be the families of two of the sons that were living with him in 1790. There is no record of Nathaniel after 1810 and we presume that he died soon after, probably in Kentucky, after which the rest of the family moved on north to Indiana where they were living in 1820 (see below). Map 1 below shows the travels of Nathaniel during his lifetime. Map 2 which is shown later, shows the travels of Nathaniel's family.

Nathaniel Gentry
Travel 1
Map 1. The Travels of Nathaniel Gentry

Neighboring Kentucky Gentrys
Just to the north of Pulaski County, in Lincoln County, at the same time as Nathaniel was moving north, two Gentrys appeared for the first time. In 1803, Isham (also spelled Isom) Gentry married Elizabeth Lunsford<10>. This was followed by a number of tax records in Lincoln County for Isham/Isom Gentry in successive years from 1805 to 1809<11>. The tax for 1809 includes three parcels of land totaling 450 acres of land on the Dix River (which runs parallel to almost the entire length of the border between Lincoln County and Garrard County). In 1810, Isham appeared in the Lincoln County census with his wife and three young daughters<13>. The census reported Isham as born before 1784. His wife was slightly younger and was probably born about 1784, meaning she had married at about age nineteen. The couple were present again in the 1820 Lincoln County census. Marriage records for Lincoln County show the marriage in 1824 of Polly Gentry to David McCullum and in 1825 of Casandra Gentry to George McAfee. Both marriages list as bondsman, a "J. Sam" Gentry as father. This surely is someone's misreading of the name "Isom" Gentry. Isham received a grant of 200 acres of land along the Rockcastle River in April 1830 but he was not in the census for that year. His family next appeared in the 1840 census for Platte County, Missouri, under the name "Isom". An assumed son, "Isom" Jr., was in the 1850 Platte County census but the senior Isham presumably had died by then. Isom Jr. moved on to Kansas from Missouri and was known as "I. B." Gentry rather than Isom.

In addition to Isham, the Lincoln County records show the marriage of a John Gentry in 1809 to Rebecca Richards. There are no land or tax records for John, but he was included in the 1810 Lincoln County census. His date of birth was reported in the census as 1784 to 1794. John was missing as a separate entry in the 1820 census, but is presumed to have been the extra adult male living with Isham at the time of the census. We can surmise that John was a brother of Isham, had lost his wife and had not remarried. In 1835, the Lincoln County records show a marriage of a John B. Gentry to Sally B. King with Sally's father serving as a bondsman. This is presumably the same John Gentry finally re-marrying years after his first wife died. John was listed in the Lincoln County census in 1840 with this wife and a very young child. The census shows both John and his wife as having been born after 1790. This suggests that the youngest of the male members in Nathaniel's household in 1791 was a grandson rather than this John who was probably born shortly afterwards.

We suggest that these two Gentrys, Isham and John, were sons of Nathaniel and that Isham was one of the sons that were included in the South Carolina census. They cannot be linked in any way to the Gentrys that were present in 1800 in nearby Green and Madison Counties, Kentucky. The few families there were all sons or grandson of Nicholas-II Gentry. There were some Johns among Nicholas' descendants, but nowhere has the name Isham been mentioned among them. We have found no record showing where Isham and John were born, but we suggest that they accompanied or preceded their father in his move to Kentucky, presumably in about 1800, went on a little father north and settled in Lincoln County.

Hypotheses Relating to Matthew Gentry


This leads us now to the family members that were living with Nathaniel in Kentucky in 1810. We suggest that most of them were the family of his hypothetical son, Matthew. We have already said that the only evidence we have as to his name is the record of two court appearances by him in the Spartanburg County Court in 1796. We have found no other evidence for Matthew and there were no members of Nathaniel's family present in Pulaski County in 1820. This leads to the conclusion that both Nathaniel and Matthew died in Kentucky, probably in Pulaski County, between 1810 and 1820.

The Indiana Gentrys
Census records in Gibson County for 1820 for the family of an "Elonder" Gentry [perhaps the spelling should be "Eleanor"?] plus one for a newly married John Gentry, coincide almost exactly with the composition of the extended family that was in Pulaski County ten years earlier <13>. In addition, two of the proposed members of this extended family appeared in the 1850 census for Gibson County giving South Carolina as their place of birth. We believe that it would be too much of a coincidence if this was not the family of our hypothetical Matthew Gentry and a brother, Reason Gentry.

In 1830, most of the individuals in the 1820 census appeared again in Posey County, Indiana, listed as four families living close together as neighbors. These included, besides Reason Gentry, Martin, Pleasant, and Enos Gentry. John Gentry and his wife, who were included in the 1820 census was missing and presumed to have died. One other member of this family that was missing in the Posey County records, can be accounted for by a Zimri [also Yimri, Zimriah, and Zimry] Gentry who was in Washington County, Illinois in 1820, being listed in the state census, but not the federal census for that county. He was joined by Levi Gentry in neighboring St. Clair County, Illinois, in 1830, which was accompanied by the disappearance of his presumed record from the Posey County, Indiana, census. By 1840, Zimri and Levi parted ways and Zimri moved to Greene County, Illinois, while Levi moved to Wayne County, Missouri. Levi was present in the 1850 census for Wayne County with his age given as 44 and his place of birth as South Carolina. That this is the same Levi as was present with Zimri in Illinois is supported by the fact that one of Levi's sons was named Zimri. Zimri was not in the 1850 census, so we do not have a record of his place of birth. There is no direct evidence that either man was related to Matthew, but their ages fit right into the pattern of the Matthew Gentry family.

By 1840, attrition had struck three of the Posey County Gentry families. Pleasant Gentry had died but his widow, Hannah, was included in the census along with his children. Enos also had died, and in November of 1940, his widow, Rachel, remarried. His family apparently moved from Posey to Vanderburgh County, Indiana, between 1830 and 1840. Most of his children continued to show up in Vanderburgh County census lists in 1850 and in 1860. Martin Gentry had also apparently died between 1830 and 1840, and his widow, Nancy, also remarried in 1845. A presumed son of Martin, Martin Jr., was living with Reason Gentry in 1850. Another family was added to the census listings in 1840 in the form of Allen Gentry, living close to his sister-in-law, Hannah. Allen was also in the 1850 census with a reported age of fifty, and born in Kentucky. If correct, this suggests that Nathaniel and his family had left South Carolina just prior to 1800. This contradicts the evidence provided by Levi's census report which shows him still present in South Carolina six years later. The only answer I have for this is that a member of Levi's family may have reported for him and knew his family had come from South Carolina, but did not realize the possibility that Levi himself may have been born in Kentucky. The placement and movement of all of these children can be seen on Map 2.

Nathaniel Travel 2
Map 2. Travels and Distribution of Nathaniel Gentry's Family

We have noted above as speculative proposals the names of all the sons of Nathaniel and Matthew . We have not discussed the possible identification of two apparent daughters of Matthew. In the 1850 census for Gibson County, Indiana, Reason Gentry was listed as living with a Minerva Harmon and her family. In fact they were listed twice, once in Montgomery Township in September 1850 and then again in Wabash Township in October of that year. Minerva was shown as age 53 in one case and as 55 in the second case, and as having been born in South Carolina. Correspondingly, Reason was listed with two different ages, 61 and 65, but born in South Carolina. The combination of her date and place of birth and the fact that Reason was living with her in both instances suggests that Minerva was a daughter of Matthew and a niece of Reason. She was included with the Nathaniel family in the 1810 census in Kentucky, but presumably some time thereafter married a man by the name of Harmon who then died before 1850.

In both cases of the double census entry, Reason was listed with Minerva, a daughter Eliza / Elizabeth, and a son James. In the earlier record, Martin Gentry (age 27, presumed to be a son of Martin Sr. of Posey County) was living with them. In the later record, Reason and Minerva's family, but not Martin, joined Jesse Harmon, a young wife, and new-born son. And in a neighboring household, a Martha Gentry was living (age 26 and presumed to be a sister of young Martin). It appears that Jesse was an older son of Minerva to whose home she and Reason moved in mid-1850. Joining them in the move was a boy, Jacob Ruperty, whose relationship is unknown, but who was living in 1860 with another Gentry family, that of Reason Jr., son of Pleasant Gentry. We have not discussed at all the identification of possible third generation Gentrys and do not intend to do so, but the combination of marriage records<12>, and census records provide a good basis for building a logical set of relationships for the second generation families.

The 1810 and 1830 census records suggest that there was a second daughter of Matthew, whom we suggest was Charlotte Gentry who married Jacob Rauth in 1830 in Posey County. She was one of Matthew's five children who were less than ten years old in the 1810 census. Somewhat arbitrarily, based on her marriage and comparing the records of these five individuals, we suggest that this daughter, whatever her name, was the middle member of the five children.

Table of Relationships
With all the names we have added for Nathaniel's family, a tabular display will best and most concisely summarize the relationships that are proposed. In the table below, all of Nathaniel's immediate family are shown with the exception of his son, Tyre. They are displayed with their respective ages as they are believed to be present in the 1790 (Spartanburg District, South Carolina) and the 1810 census (Pulaski County, Kentucky).

The succeeding data from the 1820 to 1840 censuses have been extracted from the census records found in Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri as appropriate for the particular individual. The right half of the table doubles as a time chart with column dividers serving as time lines for the years 1770, 1780, 1790, etc. This allows the addition of a rough graphical representation for each individual of the time span within which he or she was born. This simplifies the identification of the census age group for each person.

Nathaniel
chart

Conclusion
We have presented here in considerable detail (probably far more than the reader may want) our efforts to piece together many disparate facts concerning a number of Gentry families that we believe fit together to make a logical whole. We once again emphasize that the proposals for the family of Nathaniel Gentry represent a combination of many hypotheses, very few of which can be supported by solid documentary evidence. On the other hand, there is no conflicting evidence for these speculations. We believe the sum total of these hypotheses form a logical tapestry of probabilities that future research may show to be in error in a few details, but overall represent a plausible picture of that early pioneer, Nathaniel Gentry.

References
1.   a. "THE SONS OF NICHOLAS-I GENTRY, David Gentry and Family"
Journal of Gentry Genealogy, vol 2, issue 5, (Aug 2008) (revised)
      b. "NICHOLAS GENTRY THE IMMIGRANT, Revised Proposals Concerning his Family"
Journal of Gentry Genealogy, issue 2011A, (Feb 2011)

2. 1782 Surry County, North Carolina Tax Lists
originals in State Archives, Raleigh, NC
   
Name
 
Acres
Black
Polls
 
Livestock
 Joseph Gentry 150 1 3 horses, 10 cows
 Allen Gentry 200   3 horses, 5 cows
 Artha Gentry     4 horses, 3 cows
 Richard Gentry 200   3 horses, 4 cows
  Hezekiah Gentry     3 horses
  Samuel Gentry 400   3 horses, 6 cows
  Robert Gentry     1 horse
  Runnel Gentry     2 horses
  Nathaniel Gentry     1 horse
 Shelton Gentry     2 horses, 2 cows
 Samuel Gentry 150   5 horses, 5 cows
 Samuel Gentry 120    
 Nicholas Gentry 150   3 horses, 9 cows

3. Leonardo Andrea, Columbia, SC, "Gentry Family", Manuscript on microfilm compiled for
Mrs. John F. Gannon, Montgomery, AL.
a. Index II for land grants:
  Nathaniel Gentry 170 ac on Tyger River 2 Oct 1786
b. Index III:
 Nathaniel Gentry 534 ac on Pacolet River, Greenville Co.4 Feb 1793
c. Land plats indexed after the Revolution:
 Nathaniel Gentry 2 in 96 Dist.1785 and 1792

4. 1790 Federal Census, South Carolina
 Ninety-Six Dist, Spartanburgh Co. M(>16) M(<16)   F   
 p.86 Gentry, Nathaniel 233
p.86 Gentry, Samuel 325
p.86 Jentry, Tyreh 112
p.86 Jentry, Allen 102
p.87 Jentry, Sam'l 221

5. Albert Bruce Pruitt, "Spartanburg County/District, South Carolina, Deed Abstracts, Books A-T (1785-1827)",
by Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC, 1988
a. 1791 Jun 10 Bk(F-150) (p.152)
  Nansey Gentry (misreading of "Nathaniel"?) witnessed deed for sale of land on middle fork of Tyger R. known as Long Br.
b. 1792 Nov 23 Bk(F-316) (p.168)
  Nathaniel Gentry (Spartanburg) to Zabulon Bragg (same); bond of 200 pounds for deed to be made in 15 years for 100 ac on S. fork Tyger R; borders a pine tree Nathaniel sawed in the presence of Allen Gentry (and others).

6. South Carolina General Assembly Ordinance, MS Act No. 1123, 20 Feb 1779
  p.80, 101 Hezekiah Gentry Spartan District liable for grand/petit jury
p.88, 104John Gentry Spartan Districtliable for grand/petit jury
p.89Nicholas Gentry Cuffey Town & Turkey Creekliable for court service

7. Brent H. Holcomb, "Spartanburgh County, South Carolina, Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1799", Southern Historical Press, Easley, SC, 1980.
a. 1789 March Court [p.91]
  Nicholas Gentry [son of Samuel Elder?] selected to serve on jury for Sept. court.
b. 1789 Mar 18 [p.96]
  Samuel Jentry against John Chesney. Case.
Ordered, that this suit be dismissed at the Plaintiff's costs.
c. 1794 Jan 15 [p.188]
  The County against Samuel Jentry. "Qui Tam" [tax question?].
For a Brown mare, by request of the defendant this case is continued, until next court.
d. 1796 Jan 16[p.221]
  James Tanner & George Walker against Matthew Gentry. Appeal.
Ordered that the Judgment of the Justice below be recorded.
e. 1796 Jul 16 [p.222]
  Alexander McBeth & Co. against Matthew Gentry. Petition.
Settled by the defendant in open court.

8. "Index of Revolutionary War Pension Applications", National Genealogical Society, Washington, DC, 1976
  GENTRY, Richard, SC, b.VA, Justina/Jestin, W8844, BLWt26713-160-55.
Revolutionary War Pension reference (National Archives microfilm)
File W8844, (BLWt 26713-160-55): Richard GENTRY, widow Justina or Gestin, of Rockcastle Co. KY
Credited with 13 months service as a private in SC militia.

9. "Tyree Gentry", by Tom J. Gentry
  Journal of Gentry Genealogy, vol. 2, issue #11, (Nov 2002)

10. "Marriages, Lincoln Co., Kentucky", Tennessee State Library & Archives.
  1803 Sep 12 Isham Gentry Elizabeth Lunsford bond. Wm. Preston
1809 Jan 16 John Gentry Rebecca Richards bond. Benjamin Warren
1824 Apr 21 Polly Gentry David McCullum bond J Sam. [Isom] Gentry, (father)
1825 Dec 20 Casandra Gentry George McAfee bond J Sam. [Isom] Gentry, (father)
1835 Aug 17 John B. Gentry Sally B. King bond. Samuel Hocker, father Hobart King

11. "Kentucky Landholders, 1787-1811", Tennessee State Library & Archives.
  1805 Jul 22 Bk(1-07) Isom/Isham Gentry  
1806 Aug 11Bk(1-10)     "  
1807 May 25Bk(1-09)     "  
1808 Jun 9Bk(1-13)     "  
1809 May 10Bk(2-16)     "  
 Bk(1-28)     " 350 ac on Dicks [Dix] R
50 ac
50ac

12. Marriages, Gibson, Posey and Vanderburgh Counties, Indiana
a. "Indiana Marriages, 1802-1892"
URL: <http//www.ancestry.com/rd/prodredir.asp?sourceid=4717&key=D7852>
  Groom Bride Date County
Enos GentryPolly Dodge7 Mar 1822 Posey
Allen GentrySally Wilson1 Feb 1827Posey
Martin GentryNancy Temple 16 Jul 1830Posey
Enos GentryRachel McNeely 6 Sep 1827Vanderburgh
Rachel Gentry Alfred L. Everett /
    Everets
23 Nov 1840Vanderburgh
b. LDS Soundex Records
  Pleasant Gentry Hannah Wills 6 Feb 1821Gibson
Hannah GentryJames Carnahan 13 Mar 1850Gibson
c. "Early Indiana Marriages to 1850"
URL: <http:/freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~bjblitzen/indianafrygentry=marriages.htm>
  Charlotte GentryJacob Rauth 2 Jun 1831Posey
Allen GentryJane Edwards 13 Feb 1832Posey
Mahala GentryWilliam McMunn 4 Dec 1833Posey
Elizabeth GentryAndrew Gluckman 15 May 1839Posey
Reason GentryFrancis Coleman 17 Jan 1842Posey
Nancy GentryAbraham Shuck 17 Aug 1845Posey

13. Federal Census for 1810 - 1850
 
 1810 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1800-
 1810
1794-
 1800
1784-
 1794
1765-
 1784
Bef
1765
 
 Lincoln County, Kentucky
Page
117
  Isham Gentry
    (son of Nathaniel?)
M
F
0
3
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
 
117   John Gentry
    (son of Nathaniel?)
M
F
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
 
 Pulaski County, Kentucky
Page
146
  Nathaniel Gentry
    (with Matthew?)
M
F
4
1
2
0
3
1
1
0
1
1
 
 
 1820 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1810-
 1820
1804-
 1810
1802-
 1804
1794-
 1804
1775-
 1794
Bef.
1775
 Gibson County, Indiana
Page
249
  Elonder Gentry
    (wid/Matthew?)
M
F
1
1
2
0
1 3
1
1
0
0
1
Page
250
  John Gentry M
F
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
1
1
0
0
 Lincoln County, Kentucky
Page
77
  Isham Gentry M
F
1
2
0
1
0 0
1
2
1
0
0

 1830 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1825-
1830
1820-
1825
1815-
1820
1810-
1815
1800-
1810
1790-
1800
1780-
1790
bef
1780
 St. Clair County, Illinois
Page
126
  Yimri Gentry
  (son of Matthew?)
M
F
0
3
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
Page
126
  Levi Gentry
  (son of Matthew?)
M
F
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
50-60
 Posey County, Indiana
Page
183
  Martin Gentry M
F
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
Page
184
  Pleasant Gentry M
F
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
2
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
Page
185
  Reason Gentry M
F
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
50-60
Page
186
  Enos Gentry M
F
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
50-60
 
 1840 Federal Census Born->
Sex
1835-
1840
1830-
1835
1825-
1830
1820-
1825
1810
1820
1800-
1810
1790-
1800
bef.
1790
 Greene County, Illinois
Page
95
  Zimry Gentry M
F
1
2
1
2
1
2
0
2
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
 Posey County, Indiana
Page
314
  Hannah Gentry M
F
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
60-70
Page
315
  Allen Gentry M
F
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
 Lincoln County, Kentucky
Page
119
  John Gentry M
F
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
 Platte County, Missouri
Page
143
  Isom Gentry M
F
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
50-60
50-60
 Wayne County, Missouri
Page
224
  Levi H. Gentry M
F
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
 
 1850 Federal Census
     (with ages of all individuals)
Born->
Sex
1845-
1850
1840-
1845
1835-
1840
1830-
1835
1820-
1830
1810-
1820
1800-
1810
bef.
1800
 Gibson County, Indiana, Montgomery Township
Page
54
  Reason Gentry
  Martin Gentry
     with Minerva
     Harmon household
M
M
M
F
--
--
--
--
--
--
8
--
--
--
--
--
--
17
19
--
--
27 IN
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
61 SC
--
53 SC
 Gibson County, Indiana, Wabash Township   (duplicate census entry)
Page
104
  Reason Gentry
     with Minerva
     Harmon household
M
M
F
--
1
--
--
--
--
--
11
--
--
19
--
--
25
22/22
--
--
--
--
--
--
65 SC
--
55 SC
Page
104
  Martha Gentry
     with Jordan &
     Sarah Jordan
F
M
F
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
26 IN
23
22
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
 Posey County, Indiana
Page
259
  Allen Gentry
     Louisa A. (and children)
M
F
--
--
--
--
11/13
--
--
18
--
--
--
37
50 KY
--
--
--
Page
259
  Reason Gentry
     Francey
M
F
3
--
--
6/7
--
--
--
--
26 IN
26
--
--
--
--
--
--
 Vanderburgh County, Indiana
Page
496
  Martin Gentry
     Margarette
     (Other)
M
F
M
2
5
--
--
--
--
14
--
--
26 IN
24
--
--
--
--
--
--
Page
500
  Alfred Everette
     Rachel (widow / Enos)
  James Gentry
  David Gentry
M
F
M
M
--
--
7
5/8
--
--
 
14
--
--
17
--
--
40
40
--
--
--
--
 Platte County, Missouri
Page
408
  Isom Gentry
     Sarah
M
F
5/4
--
8/7/6
--
--
--
--
--
29 KY
29
--
--
--
--
--
--
 Wayne County, Missouri
Page
201
  Levi H. Gentry
     Gracy A.
M
F
--
4/1
8/6
--
14
12/19
17
--
--
--
--
35
44 SC
--
--
--

 

Feb 2011, (revisions Nov 2011, April 2015)

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